Chinese Skullcap

$25.20 or $22.68 / month

Chinese skullcap is one of the 50 fundamental herbs in Chinese medicine and has been used for more than 2,000 years. This famous herb has broad-spectrum activity and has been shown in studies to be effective against Lyme, Bartonella and Babesia in vitro.

In a 2021 study that evaluated a panel of 46 herbal medicine extracts, Chinese skullcap, along with Cryptolepis, Artemisia, Japanese knotweed and Alchornea cordifolia were the top performers in their inhibitory activity against Babesia duncani. However, Cryptolepis and Chinese skullcap performed the best.

BENEFITS

  • Neuroprotective
  • Neuro-repairing
  • Effective against Lyme, Bartonella, Babesia
  • Improves blood-brain barrier health
  • Synergistic
  • Immunoglobulin balancing (mast cell balancing)

Dosage
40 drops

Description

Chinese skullcap is one of the 50 fundamental herbs in Chinese medicine and has been used for more than 2,000 years. This famous herb has broad-spectrum activity and has been shown in studies to be effective against Lyme, Bartonella and Babesia in vitro.

In a 2021 study that evaluated a panel of 46 herbal medicine extracts, Chinese skullcap, along with Cryptolepis, Artemisia, Japanese knotweed and Alchornea cordifolia were the top performers in their inhibitory activity against Babesia duncani. However, Cryptolepis and Chinese skullcap performed the best.

Another study done in 2020 focused on herbs effective against Borrelia burgdorferi and listed Cryptolepis, black walnut, Japanese knotweed, Artemisia (sweet wormwood), cat’s claw, Cistus incanus and Chinese skullcap as the most effective herbs that showed good activity against the stationary phase Borrelia burgdorferi compared to the control antibiotics doxycycline and cefuroxime.

Chinese skullcap has also shown effectiveness in lowering excess histamine release in the body by inhibiting immunoglobulin E, making it a great choice for those dealing with histamine or mast cell problems.

A synergistic herb, Chinese skullcap often enhances the effects of other medications or supplements. However, as it could increase the potency of other herbs and drugs, be sure to consult your doctor before adding this to your regimen.

Why We Love Chinese skullcap, the restorer and killer

Chinese skullcap is one of my (Dr. Warren’s) favorite herbs for its neuroprotective, antimicrobial, and histamine-lowering properties.

For many patients in our clinic, Lyme and co-infections have caused intense neurological symptoms that are difficult to live with, whether it’s tingling, pain, brain fog, peripheral neuropathy or many other effects. Chinese skullcap is often a great choice for them because of its ability to repair leaky blood-brain barriers.

Many of our patients with histamine and mast cell issues have benefited greatly by incorporating Chinese skullcap into their protocols. One of the reasons for this is because of its ability to inhibit immunoglobulin E, which can raise histamine in the body. This is one reason we measure histamine and IgE in almost every patient who comes to our clinic. If your immunoglobulin E is elevated, this is often a product we start using earlier.

Chinese skullcap is one of the top herbs listed as being effective against Lyme, Bartonella and Babesia, by the Johns Hopkins research team which is another reason we love it and regularly use it at our clinic.

References

† These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

  1. Zhang Y, Bai C, Shi W, Alvarez-Manzo H, Zhang, Y. Identification of Essential Oils Including Garlic Oil and Black Pepper Oil with High Activity against Babesia duncani. Pathogens. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9060466 Published 2020; 9:466. Accessed January 13, 2022.
  2. Dai J, Chen L, Qiu YM, Li SQ, Xiong WH, Yin YH, Jia F, Jiang JY. Activations of GABAergic signaling, HSP70 and MAPK cascades are involved in baicalin’s neuroprotection against gerbil global ischemia/reperfusion injury. Brain Res Bull. Published January 2013; 90:1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2012.09.014. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23041106/. Epub published October 2, 2012. Accessed January 13, 2022. PMID: 23041106.
  3. Chang HH, Yi PL, Cheng CH, Lu CY, Hsiao YT, Tsai YF, Li CL, Chang FC. Biphasic effects of baicalin, an active constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, in the spontaneous sleep-wake regulation. J Ethnopharmacol. Published May 17, 2011; 135(2):359-68. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2011.03.023. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21419210/ Epub published March 16, 2011. Accessed January 13, 2022. PMID: 21419210.
  4. Guan-Wei Fan, Yuan Zhang, et. Al. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Baicalein in LPS Stimulated RAW2647 Macrophages via Estrogen Receptor and NF-B-Dependent Pathways. Inflammation. DOI:10.1007/s10753-013-9703-2. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/253335202_Anti-inflammatory_Activity_of_Baicalein_in_LPS-Stimulated_RAW2647_Macrophages_via_Estrogen_Receptor_and_NF-B-Dependent_Pathways. Published July 2013; 36(6). Accessed January 13, 2022.
  5. Feng J, Leone J, Schweig S, Zhang Y. Evaluation of Natural and Botanical Medicines for Activity Against Growing and Non-growing Forms of B. burgdorferi. Front Med (Lausanne). Published February 21, 2020; 7:6. doi: 10.3389/fmed.2020.00006. PMID: 32154254; PMCID: PMC7050641.

Warnings

Always be sure to speak with your healthcare provider before starting any new nutritional supplement when pregnant or nursing. For children, we recommend speaking with your child's pediatrician regarding proper dosing. Store away from children.

If loose stools occur, stop use and notify your healthcare practitioner.

Reviews

Be the first to review “Chinese Skullcap”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *