Cinnamon

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Cinnamon, a spice taken from the bark of the Southeast Asian cinnamon tree, is native to Ceylon. For centuries, cinnamon has been used to help the immune system. It has incredible antioxidants, such as polyphenols. The benefits don’t end there. In more recent years, cinnamon has been shown to reduce and balance blood sugar levels and improve lipid levels in diabetics.

BENEFITS

  • Effective antimicrobial against Lyme
  • Able to break through biofilms
  • Antioxidant
  • Antimicrobial
  • Can help intestinal motility
  • Helps lower and balance blood sugar levels and improves lipid levels in diabetics

Dosage
take 1 cap 2 times per day or as directed by your healthcare professional

Description

Cinnamon, a spice taken from the bark of the Southeast Asian cinnamon tree, is native to Ceylon (Sri Lanka). In Biblical times it was compared in worth to gold and ivory, and in modern times, it still holds incredible value.

For centuries, cinnamon has been used to help the immune system. It has incredible antioxidants, such as polyphenols. In one 2005 study, 26 spices were compared for their antioxidant activity. Cinnamon beat all the competition—even health staples such as garlic and oregano.

The benefits don’t end there. In more recent years, cinnamon has been shown to reduce and balance blood sugar levels and improve lipid levels in diabetics.

An exciting study published in 2017 showed it was also effective against stationary phase Lyme and was able to break through biofilms with its antimicrobial properties. The most potent essential oils against Lyme in this study were oregano, cinnamon bark and clove bud. Those three showed even higher anti-persister and anti-biofilm activity than the persister drug daptomycin.

Why We Love cinnamon, the multi-use spice

Cinnamon, besides being treasured for its incredible flavor, has been shown in studies to have anti-Lyme activity as an antimicrobial and support for balancing blood sugar (when high). For those of our patients who struggle with both Lyme and high blood sugar issues, cinnamon can kill two birds with one stone.

If you’re fighting Lyme, high blood sugar and constipation, you’re in even better luck because cinnamon also promotes healthy intestinal motility, which can ease constipation.

For many people, cinnamon offers an incredible range of help, but pay close attention when adding this product to your regimen to make sure you can tolerate it well.

If you suffer from mast cell and histamine issues, hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), or regular diarrhea, I’d recommend avoiding cinnamon in this concentrated amount. It is high in histamine, which can aggravate histamine and mast cell symptoms, and it can lead to loose stools and low blood sugar.

References

† These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

  1. Shan B, Cai YZ, Sun M, Corke H. Antioxidant capacity of 26 spice extracts and characterization of their phenolic constituents. J Agric Food Chem. Published October 5, 2005; 53(20):7749-59. PMID: 16190627 DOI: 10.1021/jf051513y. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16190627/. Accessed January 18, 2022.

  2. Hossein KH, Alireza FN, Bahram PG, Akbar AA, Ali N. Effect Of Cinnamon Supplementation On Blood Glucose And Lipid Levels In Type2 Diabetic Patients. Archives of Advances in Biosciences (Journal of Paramedical Sciences. Published winter 2011; 2(1):2-6. https://www.sid.ir/en/journal/ViewPaper.aspx?id=260175. Accessed January 18, 2022.

  3. Feng J, Zhang S, Shi W, Zubcevik N, Miklossy J, Zhang Y. High Activity of Selective Essential Oils against Stationary Phase Borrelia burgdorferi. bioRxiv 130898. Published May 17, 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/130898. Accessed January 18, 2022. Now published in Frontiers in Medicine. doi: 10.3389/fmed.2017.00169
  4. Sharma P, Sharma S, Agrawal RP, Agrawal V, Singhal S. A randomised double blind placebo control trial of cinnamon supplementation on glycemic control and lipid profile in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine. Published January 1, 2012; 24(1):4-9. ISSN:2200-3886. https://search.informit.org/doi/abs/10.3316/INFORMIT.127513664524873. Accessed January 18, 2022.

Warnings

Herbs included in this product can potentially interact with certain medications and/or may have adverse effects for individuals with certain medical conditions or allergies. Make sure to consult with your licensed healthcare provider before taking this product. Not for use during pregnancy or when breastfeeding. Store away from children

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